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Edinburgh’s Oldest Pubs
Edinburgh’s Oldest Pubs

Greyfriars Bobby's Bar is one of Scotland's most visited, photographed taverns and oldest pub in Edinburgh, located on Candlemakers' Row in the center of Edinburgh. On your ancient Edinburgh pub crawl, you must stop here.Greyfriars Bobby is located on the ground level of a row of Georgian residences connected to the fabled Candlemakers' Hall, which was established in 1722.Bobby, a legendary Skye Terrier and a genuinely good boy, was the inspiration for the bar's name. Bobby was the dog of a Night Watchman of the Edinburgh City Police who was called John Gray.Bobby worked on Gray's patrol for two years, and the two of them were inseparable since he was the best boy.This is where the story becomes a little sad, but also a little cheerful. Bobby's proprietor died of TB on February 15, 1858. He was buried in Greyfriar's Kirkyard, also known as the graveyard, which is right behind the bar.Bobby went to Gray's grave after his burial and stayed by him side for the next 14 years. It didn't take long for the locals to notice that he wanted to be at his master's side forever, and they began giving him food or inviting him into nearby businesses for some kibble.After 14 years of faithful service, the legendary good boy Bobby passed away and joined his master, the bar named itself after him to honor his commitment and dedication.

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The White Hart Inn is a historic inn in the town of White Hart

One of Edinburgh's oldest pubs is our next stop on our historic Edinburgh pub crawl. The White Hart Inn, located on Edinburgh's Grassmarket, is said to be the city's oldest tavern as well as the most haunted!The White Hart Inn is almost 500 years old, according to historical documents. It was built in 1516.According to legend, this historic Edinburgh pub crawl stop was named after a strange occurrence that allegedly occurred in 1128. King David I of Scotland was out hunting a massive white stag when he was thrown from his horse in the middle of the chase.The stag turned on the king, who begged to God for salvation. According to legend, the king was saved by a blazing cross that vanished the stag.The king constructed a shrine on the spot of his salvation, and the White Hart Inn was eventually named in honor of the event.The rumors about the White Hart Inn being haunted arise from the numerous public executions that took place directly outside this ancient pub on Grassmarket.Some individuals also claim that the White Hart has provided such excellent hospitality over the years that some of their patrons would refuse to leave, both in life and in death.

The Bar at the End of the World

The World's End Bar, located on the Royal Mile, is another of Edinburgh's oldest pubs and our second stop on our historic Edinburgh pub crawl.This tavern maintains its traditional traditions and flair, making both residents and visitors feel at ease as soon as they enter. The countless banknotes that fill the space above the bar demonstrate how many international visitors have passed through this pub's doors.The city walls that were originally part of the city's protection policy inspired the name of this stop on our Edinburgh pub tour.After the Scots were defeated by the English in the Battle of Flodden in the 16th century, the walls were built to safeguard Edinburgh.The city gates, which were built as part of the wall, are right outside this ancient Edinburgh pub crawl venue. The Universe's End was the name given to the location where the gates were built because the people of Edinburgh thought everything beyond those walls to be from another world.Keep an eye out for the spirits as well!The World's End, like most of Edinburgh's oldest pubs, has its own set of superstitions and eerie legends. Make sure you don't move the man's photo in the bar, otherwise your world will come to an end! EEK!

Tavern of Deacon Brodies

The famed Deacon Brodies Tavern is our second stop on our historic pub tour in Edinburgh, located in the heart of the city's Royal Mile.This magnificent looking and ancient tavern is named after one of Edinburgh's most prominent inhabitants, William Brodie, and is located just a few meters from Edinburgh Castle.Brodie was a member of the Guild of Wrights, a guild of highly talented carpenters, where he also served as a deacon.Not only that, but he was a member of the town council and well-liked in the neighborhood.He seemed to be a nice citizen during the day, but at night he was a burglar who liked to gamble and spend the money he stole on women.He was captured in 1788 and after being tried and found guilty of burglary, murder, and more, was executed on the very gallows he constructed.The story became legendary, and his double life was supposed to have inspired local author Robert Louis Stevenson's famous characters Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, who were published over a century after the events.

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Edinburgh’s Oldest Pubs
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